Digital Microscope


The images below were taken with a variety of microscope techniques. Some were taken with a handheld digital microscope, some with an educational digital microscope, others with a digital camera connected to a microscope, many with a macro lens, and others with a microscope objective used as a camera lens at the end of a bellows.

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Photo Stacking:
The problem with photography through a microscope or macro lens is that the more magnified the object, the shorter the depth of field. This means that only a very narrow region of the picture will be in focus at a time. One solution for this problem is to take multiple pictures focusing on different parts of the object and then combine them with a program like Zerene Stacker. Below is a series of unfocused pictures and then the stacked picture. This is followed by several more stacked pictures.

My current setup includes a StackShot device that automates the moving of the camera and snapping of the pictures. I am using a Canon MPE-65mm macro lens on a Canon T3i camera. I use Zerene Stacker software for the stacking and Photosop CS6 for editing.

Strawberry Seeds Photos:
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4.jpg5.jpg
6.jpg7.jpg
Stacked photo of the tip of a strawberry with seeds:
StrawberrySeeds2.jpg
Another stacked photo of strawberry seeds:
StrawberrySeed.jpg

Here's a spider from my front yard in Menifee. This is 60 images stacked in Zerene Stacker.
RedSpiderS.jpg

This is the same spider as above, but the stack didn't work so this is a single image.
FrontS.jpg

Here's a bee. This is a stack of 32 images.
BeeEditS.jpg

This is a stack of 170 images with a macro lens and a StackShot controller. It is a green lynx spider and is capable of spitting venom.
SpikySpiderS.jpg
This is a stack of 70 images through a macro lens. The green structures below its eyes are the fangs. there are teeth at the end of those fangs.

This is a tiny little fruit fly barely visible to the naked eye glued onto the end of a needle. This is a stack of 30 images.

FruitFlyS.jpg

This is a red-faced jumping spider (appropriate name, huh?). It's a stack of 119 images.
RedFacedFBS.jpg

Here are the fangs of a large, black spider. This is a stack of 40 images taken with a Canon MPE65 macro lens.

FangsStackCropS.jpg
This is a "White-Lined Sphinx Moth." It is a stack of 70 images taken with a macro lens at 0.2 mm between shots.

LeoMothEditS.jpg

Here's a very small fly that I see on our grape vines at home. This is around 40 images focus stacked.
FlyStackS.jpg

This is a lacewing. This is a stack of 46 images taken with a macro lens and stacked with Zerene.
Lacewing PMaxCropS.jpg

Below is a small spider with feathered bristles around its eyes and head. These are likely to detect chemicals such as phermones to find a mate. This image is a stack of 44 photos taken at 5X magnification. The inset shows a closeup crop of the area around the eyes.
SpiderMohawkEditS.jpg

Here is a horse fly at around 2X magnification. This is a stack of 77 photos.
HorseFlyEditS.jpg

This is an insect that looked blue when light hit it at just the right angle. I didn't know why until I saw this stack.
BlackBlueMothS.jpg

This is a moth. It's a stack of 138 images taken with a macro lens.
DonaldsonMothS.jpg

This is a mud dauber wasp. They live along the shores of rivers and ponds. This is a focus stack of 85 images.
FlyingInsectS.jpg

This is a flying insect magnified around 10 times. This is a stack of 71 images. The reflection is off of a CD.


This is a cranefly. It's a stack of about 100 images taken with a macro lens. You can see the compound eyes and the structures on the antennae that contain sensors to find mates.
zz2011-06-04-10.01.31_ZS_retouched.jpg

Here are the eyes of a mosquito. This is a stack of about 100 images taken with a 10X microscope objective on bellows used as the camera lens.

MosquitoCropS.jpg

Here's a spider, 92 images through macro lens.
1112_SpiderS_1.jpg

Here is a wasp or hornet. This is a stack of just over 100 images taken with a macro lens. Below that, is a zoom in on the ocelli
(the simple eyes). Many flying insects have two compound eyes and three simple eyes (ocelli).
HornetS.jpg
HornetCrop.jpg

Here are two images of a spider's eyes taken with two different microscope objectives. The circles in the eyes are not eyeballs, but reflections
of the objectives in the eyes. There are 8 eyes total, but you cannot see them all in these pictures.
1112_SpiderEyesEditedS_1.jpg

1112_SpiderEyesNikonCropColorS_1.jpg

Here's a spider and 2 of its eyes. This is a stack of 30 images taken through a 4X microscope objective.
SpiderEyeSSNikon4XCropS.jpg

Here's a small, green fly. This is a stack of about 40 images.
FlyStackS.jpg

Here is a bee's compound eye. These are stacks of between 50 and 75 images taken with a Nikon 4X achromat objective with a StackShot and external flash.
Bee4XNikonSSTubeS.jpg

BeeEye4XNikonSSBellowCropS.jpg

This is a midge, a small fly that looks like a mosquito (but doesn't bite). The feathery (plumose) antennae have sensors on them and have
more surface area when they are feathery like this so they are far more sensitive.
1112_MidgeNikon2XSSTubeS_1.jpg

Zerene Stacker also lets you simulate 3-D with cross-eyed stereograms and rocker pictures. Below is a rocker. It should move back and forth.

AnimSpider.gif

This is a hoverfly. They mimic bees and hover around flowers. This is a Zerene stack of 143 images.
HoverFlyNikon10XSs.jpg

This is a spider. It is a single image, not a stack. It just killed a bee caught in its web. See the out of focus legs? That's why I need to focus stack.
1112_Spider_1.jpg

This is a Jerusalem Cricket stack of 125 images taken with a StackShot automatic rails and a macro lens. It was dead when we found it
and when we got home, we realized that the parasitic worm below had killed it.

UnkBugDeepS.jpg

This is the Gordian worm or horsehair worm that killed the cricket above. The young live inside of the cricket absorbing nutrients through
their skin until they eventually kill the host. Some worms control the host and guide it back to water so that the cycle can start all over again.
Here's a video of the worm controlling a cricket and guiding it to water and exiting: click here
Since it absorbs nutrients, it doesn't have a functional mouth. It has no eyes, but still is able to find a mate.
GordianWormS10X_1.jpg
Here is a colorful moth. This is 99 images focus stacked together.
ColorfulMothS.jpg

Here is a closeup of the antenna of the moth above. This is a 119 image stack through a 10X microscope objective.
ColorfulMothAntennaS.jpg

Here is a crane fly's head and some zooms closer in the picture. This was taken with a Nikon infinity-corrected objective on the end of
a Tamron 90mm macro lens. It's a stack of 39 images on a StackShot.
Compilation.jpg




This is a small spider. You can see all 8 eyes. This is a stack of 50 images taken through a 10X microscope objective.
SpiderSSNikon10XS.jpg

A typical ant with compound eyes and ocelli visible.

1112_NorcoAntS_2.jpg



Here's a wasp stack. This is 84 images taken with a 10X microscope objective as the lens.
WaspSharpS.jpg

Here's a closeup of the wasp's eye.
WaspSharpCropS.jpg

Here's another crane fly taken with a 4X microscope objective as the camera lens.
CraneFlyTubes4XS.jpg

Here's a stack of a black beetle. This is 125 images through a 5X objective.
BlackBeetleSharpenedS.jpg

Housefly with compound eyes and ocelli. This is a stack of 2 images taken in the field with a macro lens.

1112_FlyStackS_1.jpg

Same fly as above but from a different angle. This is a single image, not a stack.

1112_FlyHandstandS_1.jpg

This is a mealy bug. Each bug was stacked separately and then stitched together in Photoshop.

MommyBabyStackS.jpg

Here's another ant. The objective was crooked, so parts of the image are good and other parts are not.

GrayAntS.jpg

This is the larva of a carpet beetle. It's a stack of 130 images taken through a microscope objective on bellows.

CarpetBeetleLarvaS.jpg

This is a bee with its tongue (technically, a "proboscis" sticking out. The bee was actually found dead this way and arranged in a flower for a stack of 50 images.

1112_BeeTongue_1.jpg

Here are some closeups of the center part of a bee's tongue (proboscis). These were taken with a microscope at the end of a bellows as the camera lens.
They are between 50 and 60 images each.

800BeeTongueS.jpg

TongueS.jpg

Here is a crop of a closeup of the bee's eye.

Crop800PMax.jpg

This is a winged fire ant. The winged ants spread the colony across long distances. The stinger is slightly visible. This is a stack of 60 images.

111WingedFireAnt.jpg

This is a small jumping spider. It is a single image taken in the field. The very narrow depth of focus of this lens is visible in the rock below.

111SpiderTS.jpg

This is a camelneck fly and it is very tiny. It's a stack of 78 images taken through a 4X microscope objective.

LacewingNikon4X150S.jpg

This is a shield bug stack of 50 images with a macro lens, extension tubes, and diopter.

ShieldS.jpg

This is a red damselfly stack of 160 images.

111RedDamselCloseS.jpg

Below is an iridescent fly. This is a stack of 50 photos taken through a macro lens with an enlarger lens attached to it. It had been
dead for a very long time. That is the reason for the damage to the eye.

IridescentFlyS.jpg

Here's the same fly, but at higher magnification. This is a stack of 165 images taken through a 10X microscope objective on bellows.

IridFlyMicroS.jpg

This is a very young funnel spider taken in the field, single image. It is standing in a defensive position and its 8 eyes are visible.

111_YoungFunnelSpiderS_1.jpg

Praying mantis stack of 3 pictures taken outside with a macro lens.
MantidTamron1S.jpg

Honey Bee's eye

PMaxSmall.jpg
Crane fly (5 stacked images with Macro lens) and close-up of crane fly's head (88 stacked images through microscope)
1112_SmallDMap_2.jpg

1112_SmallPMaxretouchautolevelsharpencrop_1.jpg

Here's a small spider's head and you can count 8 eyes!
1112_PMaxSmall_2.jpg
Bee's head taken with a 4X microscope objective as the camera lens at the end of a tube, stack of 47 images.

BeePMaxS.jpg

The eye of the bee above taken with a 10X microscope objective as the camera's lens.

BeeEye10XPMax.jpg

A dragonfly that was caught in a spiderweb

2010-08-13-22.04.36_ZS_PMax2.jpg

Same dragonfly, different technique

DFEyeS.jpg

A damselfly stack of about 50 photos taken with a macro lens.
RedDamselS.jpg

A blue beetle approximately 0.4 cm long (has water droplets all over it)

ResizeAutoToneSharpen.jpg

BlueBeetleSteadyS.jpg

This is a grasshopper taken with a macro lens on extension tubes. This is a stack of about 45 images.

GHFullTubesS.jpg

Same grasshopper, but this time with the camera lens reversed and a stack of about 12 images.

GhopperRevOEMS.jpg

Here's the grasshopper's eye. This was taken with a microscope objective attached to the front of the camera lens. It's a stack of 15 images.

GHEye10XOEM.jpg

This is a wasp. The photo is a stack of 50 images taken with a Tamron 90 mm macro lens.

WaspMacroS.jpg

Here's the same wasp above, but with 68 mm of extension tubes added, some cropping, and some photoshop sharpening.

WaspFullTubeCrop.jpg


Here are stacks of pictures of a caterpillar taken with a Casio Exilim and a Raynox diopter. The first is a stack of 4 pictures and the second is a stack of 2 pictures.

CaterpillarStackS.jpg

Caterpillar2S.jpg

Here is a stack of a grasshopper. This was taken with a macro lens on extension tubes with a diopter lens snapped on.

GrasshopperStackS.jpg

Here's the same grasshopper zoomed in a little. This is with a macro lens and extension tubes, a stack of 10 images.

GHopperSideCloseS.jpg

This is a black widow's face. This is a stack of images taken with a 10X microscope objective on the end of bellows used as the camera lens.

BlackWidowStack10XBellowsS.jpg

This is a funnel spider. They make huge webs with a funnel at the bottom. They just wait for something to crawl onto the web and run out of the funnel to attack. This is a single image, not stacked.
FunnelSpiderS.jpg

A honey bee drinking pollen through its proboscis.

BeeMacroS.jpg
A small, colorful spider (single image macro lens).
RedBlackSpiderS.jpg

A butterfly's head

BFHeadPMaxS.jpg

An aphid on a rose.

AphidPMaxS.jpg

This is a Damselfly's face. It's head was too wide for one shot, so I stitched together two stacks and the alignment was not perfect.
DamselHeadPatchedS.jpg

An iridescent fly

RFRetS.jpg

The scales on a butterfly's wing

BFWPMaxS.jpg

Male Carpenter Bee, approximately 3 cm long

CBRayF16Tam1-125S.jpg

Dragonfly's face, stacked with a regular macro camera lens

DFFaceCS5Tamron.jpg

Small fly with a nearly transparent eye.

WhiteEyeOldObj.jpg
Here's a closeup of the compound eye of the fly above. You can also see a simple eye (ocelli) surrounded in orange.
WhiteEyeS.jpg

Little white spider. See the smiley face?
CropCloneSmall.jpg

SmallRetouchAutoLevelCrop.jpg

Smallretouched.jpg

Stack of about 3 pictures of a damsel fly taken handheld with a macro lens.
DamselS.jpg


Ladybug's compound eye at 40X stack of 35 images
SmallALPMax.jpg

A small, colorful beetle through the microscope:
BeetlePMaxS.jpg

Stacked photo of an ant's eye (with poor lighting):
AntEye.jpg
Stacked photo of an ant's head:
AntHead2.jpg
Stacked photo of an ant with some of the supporting unfocused pictures:
a1.jpga3.jpga5.jpg
AntWhole.jpg
Very large black ant's head

BlackAntSmall.jpg

Hornet's body

HornetBodySmall.jpg
Hornet's Eye

HornetEyeSmall.jpg

HornetHeadSmall.jpg
Hornet's head and shoulders (above)

Hornet's stinger (below)- Notice no barb so it can sting repeatedly. The drop of liquid is probably insecticide, not venom. These came from the awnings of my house.
StingerSmall.jpg
Fruit Fly
DMapSmall.jpg
Another hornet's eye
AutoLevelsSmallPMax.jpg
This is some sort of beetle. It has some strange feature behind its eyes.

SmallPMaxBeetle.jpg

This is a closeup of the feature behind its eyes

SmallPMax2.jpg

This is a closeup of its compound eye.

SmallPMax3.jpg

This is a stack of a long dead and dirty bee taken with a macro lens on extension tubes. Look at how fuzzy it is!

BeeExtensionTubes.jpg

A small wasp.

RedEyesPMaxS.jpg

The simple eyes (ocelli) of the wasp above. This picture was taken with a microscope objective on a bellows.

RetBel10XS.jpg


Underside of a black widow spider

CS5RedBlackWidowS.jpg
A chain of diatoms taken through a microscope:

Diatom1PMaxS.jpg

Same type of diatoms, different microscope
Diatoms2PMaxS.jpg
Another microorganism from aquarium water
Diatom3S.jpg

Images below this line are not stacked.

Pictures taken at Family Science Night at Evan's Ranch Elementary School:
aphids.jpg
Bug3.jpg
Bug4.jpg
Bug5.jpg
Bug.jpg
Crystal.jpg
Crystalline mineral
Flower.jpg
FlowerParts.jpg
Reproductive parts of a small flower
HeadHair.jpg
MintLeaf.jpg
Mint Leaf
PencilTip.jpg
Pencil Tip
PlantStem.jpg
Plant Stem
RoseLeafE.jpg
Rose Leaf Edge
Salt.jpg
Salt Crystals
SowBug.jpg


Pictures taken for Chris McLeod's class at Bella Vista Middle School in Temecula:

Pictures of sporangia, sori and indusia of a fern found in Temecula in the Santa Margarita River

FernIndusia40X.jpg
FernIndusia.jpg
FernSori.jpg
FernSoriIndusia.jpg

A very small bug on a pink flower petal
BugonFlowerPetal.jpg












BugOnRosePetal.jpg















Pictures of a celery stalk that was set in red food coloring over night to draw the food coloring up the xylem
FoodColorCelery2.jpg

























FoodColorCelery40X.jpg

























FoodColorCelery.jpg


























FoodColorCeleryEnd.jpg

























Pictures of the reproductive structures and leaves of a rose

RoseAnthers140X.jpg

























RoseAnthers.jpg

RosePistils.jpg

RosePistilsandAnters.jpg

RoseLeaf2.jpg

RoseLeaf.jpg


Pictures that I've taken in the past:

Blade of grass at 40X and 140X
Grass40X.jpg
Grass140X.jpg

Kite String, 140X
KiteString.jpg























Hair that was pulled and hair that fell out, 140X
HairPull.jpg
HairFell.jpg
Here are some pictures of fossil fish scales from Newport Beach, CA. I know that it doesn't sound spectacular to find fossil fish scales at the beach, but these were at the base of a cliff almost 100 feet tall and hence are very old.

FossilFishScaleNewport.jpg

FossilFishScaleNewport2.jpg

These are pictures of different types of sand from around the world. You can see how the material from which the sand is made affects the composition as well as how long the sand has been rolling around in the surf.
Hawaii:
BlackSandHawaii.JPG
NorthShoreOahu.JPG
PolihaleBeachHI.JPG
Cocoa Beach, Florida
CocoaBeachFL.JPG